Lisson Gallery

Lisson Gallery
Line
Thursday, 21. January 2016 | 6- 8 pm
Exhibition: 22 January – 12 March 2016
27 & 52 Bell Street
London NW1 5BU
http://www.lissongallery.com/exhibitions/line

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Drawing is both physical entity and intellectual proposition in ‘Line’, Lisson Gallery’s group exhibition, guest-curated by Drawing Room. Fifteen international artists – whose works span seminal artworks from the late ’60s through to performative and site-specific pieces made especially for this exhibition – take their various lines for a walk off the page to intermingle in the three-dimensional space of the gallery, extending via sound into the atmosphere and reverberating via action and memory across time.

Lisson Gallery’s almost fifty-year history frames the exhibition. Sol LeWitt’s Wall Drawing 157, a diagonal line first drawn according to the artist’s instructions by Nicholas Logsdail in 1973 and re-drawn again for this exhibition, suggests an expanded field for contemporary art through its conceptual premise. Richard Long’s 1980 work A Four Day Walk describes an imaginary line in the ground measuring 94 miles, which shifts the parameters of drawing to consider man’s physical yet transitory relationship with the world. Long’s ephemeral line contrasts poignantly with British artist K. Yoland’s recent photography series, Border Land Other (2013-2014), the result of a residency in Texas, shown alongside a film of her performance of the same name. The performer unfurls an unruly paper line, which refuses to settle in one spot, referencing the complexity of carving up land on a map and the arbitrariness of borders. Here the line describes not one person’s passage but instead a political boundary not to be crossed, namely the border between Texas and Mexico. A recent work by Julian Opie also brings the natural world into the gallery via a black vinyl installation, Pine Forest. The vertical procession of tree trunks can also be read as a parade of silhouetted figures, a stream of barcode data or simply as abstract lines.

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