ARTSPACE GALLERY LONDON

ARTSPACE GALLERY LONDON
YVES HAYAT TRANSPARENCIES
Preview March Tuesday 31st 2015 | 6 – 9pm
Exhibition: 31.March – 18. April  2015
7 Milner Street, London SW3 2QA
http://www.artspace-london.com

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Yves Hayat, Hermès Bag with barbed wire
(Femmes au bord de la crise de guerre series)

YVES HAYAT belongs to that category of remarkable artists who have something to say and
who says it with such talent that they stamp their impression on the art of our time. His works,
modern, contemporary, are however the product of a deeply classical culture. Thanks to all the
techniques which belong to our time: photography, superimposition of images, etc…. he creates
an original work rooted in the human cultural heritage but which, through the strength of its subjects,
conveys every dimension of our era.
Through a strictly artistic approach, Yves Hayat expresses a philosophical thought, not in complicated
words but by speaking to our senses, in a clear, untortured way. He presents the essence
of our human condition and of our time, bringing out its distinctive characteristics and its
violence (…)

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IDEES NOIRES

Inkjet print on transparent film, burnt and included in
plexiglass boxes 15 x 20 x 6 cm, ed. 8 & 30 x 40 x 10 cm, ed. 3

The originality of Yves Hayat’s works lies in the amalgam of artistic perception with the images
from a communication and information based society. The titles he gives to his works (Business
must go on, Parfum de Révolte, the Icons are Tired, Idées Noires …), utterly high jacked
advertising slogans, have the effect of giving a meaning to the pollution of our everyday lives.
They reveal our identity and display our own brand. Not a celebration of barbarity, but rather the
fascination created by human ambivalence (…).

Bildschirmfoto 2015-03-26 um 12.27.13

Inkjet print on transparent film, burnt and included in plexiglass boxes
15 x 20 x 6 cm, ed. 20 & 30 x 40 x 10 cm, ed. 3

PARFUM DE REVOLTE
Inkjet print on transparent film, burnt and included in plexiglass boxes
15 x 20 x 6 cm, ed. 20 & 30 x 40 x 10 cm, ed. 3
The Arab Spring is certainly a “popular” topic for contemporary artists to reflect upon in their work. It’s highly relevant, it’s in the news and many art institutions and galleries are eager to seize the moment and through these artists’ visions present their own mirror to the global political unrest.
In the recent years many artists of Arab descent have chosen quite a few unique means for expressing their thoughts and feelings about the current events in the Middle East. Some chose graphic literal forms and language, and some found much more subtle yet no less powerful tools to express themselves. Such was the body of work by a French artist of Egyptian descent Yves Hayat.
Hayat, an established artist best known for his photographic works, chose an iconic image recognizable the world over. But the true meaning of these layered transparent film prints, encased in clear plexiglass boxes, becomes apparent only if you give each image the careful consideration it deserves. Suddenly this object of beauty and desire assumes a far more sinister personality. Juxtaposed
within one object the outlined images of the sculpted Chanel N. 5 bottles and the words Baghdad, Kabul, Homs, Istanbul, Lhassa in their clean, unobstructed, elegant fonts appear menacing. As Mark Hachem, the owner of the eponymous gallery in Paris tells us, that is the point.
The artist’s intention is to draw our collective attention to the West’s underlaying intention for launching wars, consumerization
of the conflict zones and the imposition of a capitalist system, a Western culture of heightened consumerism
onto cultures foreign to it. With elegance and subtlety Hayat points to these various forms of colonization using instantly
recognizable imagery and allowing the viewer to complete the narrative without a single superfluous word.
Art Southampton 2013, iInterview of Mark hachem by Kristina Nazarevskaia © galleryIntell 2013

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LES ICONES SONT FATIGUEES / THE ICONS ARE TIRED

(…) Enclosed in Plexiglass boxes, the «Icons are tired,» are the sleepy faces of celebrities : Dali and Frida Kahlo,
Che Guevara and Marilyn Monroe, Jim Morrison and Mao. Those faces are marked by the deterioration of an
old and burnt film. Yves Hayat, real navigator in a virtual time, doesn’t hesitate to close the eyes of those he
represents. This universe of consumed icons, finally shows in a mirror, through the system of advertising and
fashion, receiving the reflection of the same seductive look returned to Narcisse by the pond which reflected,
sentencing him to solitude, and tends to exclude dialogue with the otherness .(…)
Viana Conti
Yves Hayat_nel Mito digitale dell’immagine per una Riscrittura del Corpo – Genova october 2008 – Translated from Italian

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YVES HAYAT

Originally from Egypt, Yves Hayat first developed his aesthetic sensibilities living in this country enriched with history and cultural diversity. Art was his first love. In 1956, after the Egyptian Revolution, Hayat left for France. For five years, he studied Art at the Ecole Nationale des Arts Décoratifs of Nice.

In 1973, Hayat chooses to go into advertising and marketing, which led him to open his own agency. The creative trade captive Hayat. His experience in the field also enabled him to discover and learn to use new forms of technologies, and to master his techniques. In the 1990s, equipped with those skills, he decided to return to the Art and rediscovers the old masters, photographing people, the streets, society products, museum paintings and recuperating magazine and web images which are carefully classified. Hayat is a perfect example of his time: an open mind on society, its streets, its media, its internet. While running his successful advertising business, he starts to show his artwork in galleries. Soon, his art activity took precedence over his profession, which he stopped in 2002.

Although Yves Hayat does not consider himself as a painter, photographer or designer, he is widely known as a “plasticien”, an untranslatable French term that refers to an artist who puts the meaning of his work to the fore and uses all the various media artistic expression, all the techniques and supports to express it.

Yves Hayat explains : “I admit that I’m more interest in manipulating reality than in recording it. My artwork between photography, installation and “Figuration Narrative” proposes visions where theatricalization is a part of the project. I am a total visual consumer: I film, download, scan, retouch…. as the director of a new reality. Using superimpositions, shifts, misappropriations, I confront past and present, beauty and horror, luxury and violence, indifference and fanaticism. Through a questioning about the art/ politic/ media relations, I try to conceive a critical art work where the attraction for the culture of media, cinema and advertising shows through. Using modern techniques, my work proposes a report of what our history and our society have thought, generated, transformed, destroyed… while always keeping in mind that when the work of Art creates unrest, it evacuates the common place”.

As François Birembaux wrote, YVES HAYAT belongs to that category of remarkable artists who have something to say and who says it with such talent that they stamp their impression on the art of our time. His works, modern, contemporary, are however the product of a deeply classical culture. Thanks to all the techniques which belong to our time: photography, superimposition of images, etc…. he creates an original work rooted in the human cultural heritage but which, through the strength of its subjects, conveys every dimension of our era.

Through a strictly artistic approach, Yves Hayat expresses a philosophical thought, not in complicated words but by speaking to our senses, in a clear, untortured way. He presents the essence of our human condition and of our time, bringing out its distinctive characteristics and its violence (…)
The originality of Yves Hayat’s works lies in the amalgam of artistic perception with the images from a communication and information based society. The titles he gives to his works (Business must go on, Parfum de Révolte, the Icons are Tired,…), utterly high jacked advertising slogans, have the effect of giving a meaning to the pollution of our everyday lives. They reveal our identity and display our own brand. Not a celebration of barbarity, but rather the fascination created by human ambivalence (…).
EXHIBITIONS :
Since 2006, Yves Hayat exhibited for solo shows in Paris, Vienna, Cologne, Geneva, Brussels, Greece, Kuwait, Beirut, Monaco, Cannes… and New York and Istanbul in 2015
and in institutional places such as Paris City Hall (Solo show), Venice (Palazzo Bonvicini, Biennale 2013 (Solo show) and Vitraria Glass+A Museum in 2014-2015), Alliance Française of Montevideo (Solo show), Docks of Marseilles (Solo show), Sigmund Freud Museum Vienna, Klosterneuburg Monastery Vienna, Château-Musée Grimaldi Cagnes-France, …

He was also presented on several international art Fairs :
Scope Basel, Art Beirut, ArtFair Cologne, Art Southampton-New York, Contemporary Istanbul, Art Stage Singapore, Scope Miami, Art 14 London, India Art Fair, FotoFever Paris, Art Miami New York,…

All details on:
http://www.hayat-art.com
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Yves-Hayat-Art/420718804705040
PRESS BOOK

CATALOGUE 2014

SHOWS

Opening Hours:
Tuesday – Friday 11am – 6pm / Saturday 11am – 4pm

Mark Hachem Gallery Paris
http://www.markhachem.com

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http://www.estherartnewsletter.com/index.php/news/news-international

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